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Unique Coffee Recipes for National Coffee Day!

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national coffee dayWhether you love it or hate it, coffee is one of America’s favorite beverages. The inky black drink makes up 75% of the average American’s caffeine intake. Did you know that Americans drink almost 400 million cups of coffee PER DAY? That makes us the number one consumer of coffee and coffee beans. We are, literally, brewing up a storm!

Now, there are many different legends surrounding the origins of the coffee plant and how it came stateside. One of the best stories is a rather fascinating account from Ethiopia, in which a goat-herd notices how excited his animals became after nibbling on certain brown berries. In a moment of pure inspiration, the goatherd decided to stew the berries in hot water. What he tasted, changed the world.

These stories are all full of adventure, but not too much historical fact. In actuality, the first reference to coffee as we know it today (that is, where the beans are ground and brewed with hot water) comes from Yemen, sometime in the middle 15th century. Soon, the berries and the native brewing method would be transported from Yemen into the Middle East and then to Italy where, from the Port of Venice, it was shipped across Europe and across the globe.

So, coffee is both delicious to drink and wonderfully historic! If that wasn’t enough, you can also cook with it. We “poured over” our sources to find some original and unique recipes that you can make using coffee, coffee grounds, and coffee beans! Try them today, September 29th, for National Coffee Day.




via Real Simple

Coffee-Crusted Pork Tenderloin


Ingredients



  • 1 (11/2 lb.)   pork tenderloin

  • 3 tbsp. instant espresso powder

  • 1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. brown sugar

  • 1 tsp. sweet paprika

  • 1 tsp. smoked paprika

  • 2 tsp. kosher salt

  • 1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

  • 2 tbsp. olive oil, divided

  • 1 tbsp. butter


Directions


Heat the oven to 400° F.

Combine the espresso powder, brown sugar, sweet paprika, smoked paprika, salt, and pepper in a small bowl. Rub the mixture over the pork until the surface is entirely coated. Drizzle pork with 1 tbsp. of the olive oil. Set aside at room temperature for 10 minutes.

Add the remaining olive oil and butter to a large, oven-safe skillet over medium-high heat. When skillet is hot, add the pork and cook, turning as needed, until browned on all sides, about 8 minutes.

Transfer skillet to oven and roast pork until a thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the tenderloin reads 145° F, about 15 minutes. Remove from oven and let rest, covered, for 10 minutes.

To serve, slice tenderloin into rounds and drizzle with pan juices.




via Meals.Com

Coffee Glazed Nuts


Ingredients



  • 2 tbsp. Hot water

  • 1 1/2 tsp. Instant Coffee Granules

  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar

  • 1 tbsp. honey or light corn syrup

  • 1/4 tsp. Kosher salt

  • 3 cups whole mixed nuts (such as walnuts, pecans and unsalted almonds)


Directions


Preheat your oven to 350° F and line baking sheet with foil.

Combine the hot water and coffee granules in medium saucepan; stir until dissolved. Next, stir in the sugar, honey and salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat; stir in nuts until completely coated. Spread in a single layer over the prepared baking sheet.

Place the baking sheet in the oven and bake for 5 minutes, then stir the nuts, so they won't burn to the foil. Bake for an additional 10 minutes, stirring halfway through bake time. Cool completely on baking sheet. Break into pieces; and store in an airtight container. Can be made up to one week in advance.




via Crumb Kitchen

Coffee Meringues


Ingredients



  • 3 egg whites, room temperature

  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar

  • 1/4 tsp. cream of tartar

  • ½ tsp. salt

  • 2 tsp. instant coffee granules, divided


Directions


Preheat oven to 275 degrees. Prepare a large cookie sheet with parchment paper and set aside.

Using an electric hand mixer or stand mixer with a whisk, whip the egg whites on high speed until light and foamy. Add in sugar, cream of tartar and salt and mix until stiff peaks form and the sugar is completely dissolved.

Gently fold in 1 tsp. instant coffee granules until combined.

Fill a Ziploc bag with the tip cut off or a piping bag with the meringue batter and pipe onto the prepared cookie sheet, leaving at least 1 inch in between. Sprinkle with remaining 1 tsp. of coffee granules.

Bake meringues for 50 minutes to 1 hour, then allow to cool. Enjoy immediately or store in an airtight container 2-3 days.




via Foodie With Family

Coffee Jelly


Ingredients



  • 4 cups VERY strongly brewed coffee, preferably a darker roast

  • 1/4 cup lemon juice

  • 5 1/2 cups granulated sugar

  • 1 box Pectin


Also Needed:


  • 5 to 6 (8 ounce) jelly jars with new two-piece lids.


Directions:


Stir the coffee and lemon juice together in a 4 quart saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. In a separate bowl, whisk together the sugar and pectin. Add the sugar to the boiling coffee mixture all at once, and whisk vigorously for 2 minutes, or until the pectin and sugar are fully dissolved into the solution. Return the mixture to a full rolling boil, and boil for exactly 1 minute. Remove the pan from the heat, ladle into clean 8 ounce jars, wipe the rims with a damp paper towel, and screw on new, two-piece lids until fingertip tight.

Use the Boiling Water Bath method to process the jars for 10 minutes. Carefully transfer to a cooling rack or a tea towel on the counter and let cool, undisturbed, overnight. After the jars are cooled, remove the rings, wipe clean, and label. The jelly should be stored in a dark place -preferably a cool one- free of temperature fluctuations. It is best used within the year.